How old is the Congregational Church?

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How old is the Congregational Church?

The origins of Congregationalism are found in 16th-century Puritanism, a movement that sought to complete the English Reformation begun with the separation of the Church of England from the Catholic Church during the reign of Henry VIII (1509–47).

What was the Congregational Church system?

Congregationalist polity, or congregational polity, often known as congregationalism, is a system of ecclesiastical polity in which every local church congregation is independent, ecclesiastically sovereign, or “autonomous”. Its first articulation in writing is the Cambridge Platform of 1648 in New England.

Why was the Congregational Church founded?

Established by settlers in present-day New England fleeing religious persecution in their native England, the Congregational churches were identified with the Puritan theological and political perspective within Anglo-Saxon Protestantism during the 17th century.

What is the difference between Presbyterian and Congregationalist?

In general, Presbyterians maintained a conservative theological posture whereas Congregationalists accommodated to the challenges of modernity. At the turn of the century Congregationalists and Presbyterians continued to influence sectors of American life but their days of cultural hegemony were long past.

Why was the Congregational Church important?

Congregational churches have had an important impact on the religious, political, and cultural history of the United States. Congregational churches and ministers influenced the First and Second Great Awakenings and were early promoters of the missionary movement of the 19th century.

Who founded Congregationalist?

The “Congregational way” became prominent in England during the 17th-century Civil Wars, but its origins lie in 16th-century Separatism. Robert Browne has been regarded as the founder of Congregationalism, though he was an erratic character and Congregational ideas emerged independently of him.

What do Congregationalists believe about baptism?

However, unlike most Baptists, Congregationalists practice infant baptism, and they view baptism as a joining of God’s family and a symbol of Christ’s resurrection. They believe this is a family that can be joined at any age.

What is the difference between Puritans and Congregationalists?

Theologically, the Puritans were “non-separating Congregationalists.” Unlike the Pilgrims, who came to Massachusetts in 1620, the Puritans believed that the Church of England was a true church, though in need of major reforms.

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