Why did they march across the bridge in Selma?

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Why did they march across the bridge in Selma?

The marches were organized by nonviolent activists to demonstrate the desire of African-American citizens to exercise their constitutional right to vote, in defiance of segregationist repression; they were part of a broader voting rights movement underway in Selma and throughout the American South.

Who was Edmund Pettus and what did he do?

Edmund Winston Pettus (July 6, 1821 – July 27, 1907) was an American lawyer and politician who represented Alabama in the United States Senate from 1897 to 1907. He served as a senior officer of the Confederate States Army, commanding infantry in the Western Theater of the American Civil War.

What is the significance of the Edmund Pettus Bridge?

The Edmund Pettus Bridge was the site of the conflict of Bloody Sunday on March 7, 1965, when police attacked Civil Rights Movement demonstrators with horses, billy clubs, and tear gas as they were attempting to march to the state capital, Montgomery.

What was the purpose of Selma?

Fifty years ago, on March 7, 1965, hundreds of people gathered in Selma, Alabama to march to the capital city of Montgomery. They marched to ensure that African Americans could exercise their constitutional right to vote — even in the face of a segregationist system that wanted to make it impossible.

What happened on Edmund Pettus Bridge?

Can you walk across the Edmund Pettus Bridge?

Quick and easy 10 minute walk back & forth. It still is an active roadway bridge with cars yet has a safe pedestrian walkway on both sides of the lanes. Give 1/2 hour to 45 minutes to visit and learn at the U.S. National Park Interpretive Center located in the building right on the corner closest to the bridge.

What happened on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma Al that was significant for the civil rights movement?

The Edmund Pettus Bridge, now a National Historic Landmark, was the site of the brutal Bloody Sunday beatings of civil rights marchers during the first march for voting rights. After Bloody Sunday, protestors were granted the right to continue marching, and two more marches for voting rights followed.

Why is the Edmund Pettus Bridge important?

The Edmund Pettus Bridge, now a National Historic Landmark, was the site of the brutal Bloody Sunday beatings of civil rights marchers during the first march for voting rights.

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